Aerial Mirage Jugglers

Glossary of juggling/passing terms

All of the juggling terms you will need to know (or perhaps simply all of the ones which we know)

1-count
Ultimates
Objects are exchanged every count, counting both hands. There are no self throws.
2-count
Solids
Everys
Showering
A passing pattern where a passing beat alternates with a self beat. The simplest version is 2-count.
3-count
Waltz
Ultimate Every-others
Passing pattern where objects are exchanged every third count, counting both hands, so passes alternate from the two hands. Called Waltz because of the 2/3 time nature... Pass Self Self Pass Self Self. This is a very versatile pattern. It is open to many tricks and syncopations, it allows for balance between the hands, and it is the 'default' pattern for some experience passers.
4-count
Every-others
The "default" passing pattern for many people for many years...
6-count
A quite boring pattern where a pass is made only once in 6 counts.
Corrections
When a club does not arrive to your satisfaction, you might need to ask your partner for slight corrections in his passes. A number of terms have been used to describe the problem, and there are solutions to make things better. Many of these attributes are interrelated, and changing one may require a minor adjustment in another.
Early
Problem: The club is arriving sooner than it should. Solution: The club should be thrown earlier, or with higher arc.
High
Problem: The club is arriving higher than desired. Solution: The club should be thrown with a lower arc, or perhaps less spin will allow for a normal catch.
Inside
Problem: The club is arriving to the inside (that is, toward the head) of where the catcher wants it.
Late
Problem: The club is arriving later than it should, forcing the receiver to wait for it (and then rush subsequent throws). This could be because it is thrown too late, or too slowly (soft/high).
Long
Problem: The club is arriving behind the point where the catcher wants it.
Low
Problem: The club is arriving below the point where the catcher wants it. This can also be a symptom of under spin.
Outside
Problem: The club is arriving outside where the catcher wants it, causing him to reach away from his body to catch it.
Over spun
Over
Problem: The club has too much rotation on it, causing the club to be upside down, or perhaps just causing the catcher to reach up to grab it early, or having the knob 'in the way' of the handle when going to make the catch. Solution: Normally the solution is for the passer to put less rotation on the club.
Short
Problem: The club is arriving in too far in front of the catcher, causing him to reach (or lunge!) for it.
Under Spun
Under
Problem: The club has too little rotation on it, causing the club to be upside down, or causing the catcher to have to wait too long to catch it. Solution: Normally the solution is for the passer to put more rotation on the club.
Feed
A pattern where one juggler is passing clubs two at least two others, usually doing twice as many passes as either one of them. In the 'default' 3-person feed, there is one feeder and two feedees, the feeder is doing a 2-count, alternating passes to the feedees, who are doing a 4-count (one passing on count 1, the other on count 3).
Alternating Feed
Rotating Feed
Sweep feed
A feed where the passes are made going from feedee to feedee back and forth, left-to-right and right-to-left. For instance, if A is feeding B, C, and D, then the sequence of a sweep feed might be B C D C B C D C B. It could instead go in the opposite direction (i.e. start with D). This is the 'usual' feed when facing three feedees. The center feedee has half of the passes of the feeder, the outside feedees half of that. So, a 2-count for the feeder turns into a 4-count for the center feedee, and a boring 8-count for the outside feedees. Compare to Typewriter Feed.
Typewriter Feed
Carriage Return
A feed where the passes are made going from feedee to feedee in one direction, but not the other. For instance, A is feeding B, C, and D, then the sequence of a typewriter feed might be B C D B C D. It could instead go in the opposite direction. (The ultimate typewriter feed is when the feeder is in the center of a circle, and spins continuously in one direction, feeding as he faces each feedee in turn). Compare to Sweep Feed.
Handacross
Pass-across
Zip
A club handed directly from hand to the other, not thrown or tossed. This is a '2' in (passing) siteswap notation, and it should usually be done quickly... In a causal diagram, it actually points backwards (or at same time) in time, because it 'causes' the previous throw to be made.
Hiccup
Hurry
Hiccough
A situation where a hand has to throw twice in succession, instead of after an (expected) intervening throw from the other hand. A hand which has a hold for a long time is not hurried when the next prop arrives. "Hurry" really is an unfortunate term, as there are many patterns where throws are rushed, but they are not "hurries". "Hiccough"/"hiccup" would seem better to describe the interruption of the left-right sequence, but, alas, "hurry" may be too entrenched.
Ho-ho
Hoho
An 'extra' pass during a pattern. Say A is doing a 4-count feed with B and C... passing to B on beat 1, and C on beat 3. An opportunity for a ho-ho would be for A to pass with B (or C) on beat 2 (or 4 or both).
Pass
A throw from one juggler to another
Diagonal
A pass thrown from one shoulder to the same shoulder of another juggler, when they are facing each other. That is, a pass thrown from the right hand to the right shoulder, or from the left hand to the left shoulder.

Picture a rectangle (or parallelogram, for feed patterns, etc.) connecting the two jugglers, with the shoulders of the jugglers being the corners of the box. Tramline (and self) passes go along the sides of the box, diagonal passes cross through the box to the opposite corner.

Double
This is nominally a throw which is in the air twice as long as a normal (single-spin) pass, and spins "twice" before landing in the catching hand.
Single
Single spin
A pass or self throw which is thrown at 'single height' (normal juggling height in a 3-club cascade) and spins 'once' before being caught. A single-height throw can also have more (or fewer) spins than one, making it harder to throw and catch.
Triple
A throw or pass which rises to a height about three times that of a single-spin throw, and also turns three times before being caught.
Zap
A quick no-spin pass from one person to another. Related to a site-swap zip, but between passers. This is not a flat pass; the zap should rotate up just enough to be caught as a regular pass.
PPS Notation

This includes several styles of notation for giving a short-hand description of a (passing) pattern. Among them:

The simplest

Slightly more complicated

In patterns with more than two people, the juggler to which the throw is to be made needs to be identified. Thus,

Yet more complicated, for > 2 persons

However, these notations don't handle double or triple spins, and the difference between St & Se is hard to see quickly. So, Dave & Ron are experimenting with something else. For instance,

What do you think? Should the hand which throws the club/self be identified as well? How to identify the target hand of a self throw if it isn't the "usual" target for such a throw? (E.g. would 'S' expected to be a self to opposite hand, but 2S be to the same hand?)

Reachacross
Catching a club on the 'wrong' side of the body by reaching across your pattern to catch it. (Why? 'forced' fast-slow ...)
Self throw
A toss by the juggler to himself, instead of passing it to a partner. Usually this takes the form of left-right or right-left throw, just as in a cascade. Self throws give the juggler time to 'catch up' with the pattern, sync up with the partners, pick up a dropped club, etc.
Straight pass
tramline pass
tramline
A pass thrown from one shoulder to the opposite shoulder of another juggler, when they are facing each other. That is, a pass thrown from the right hand to the left shoulder, or from the left hand to the right shoulder. See also diagonal pass.
widdershins
counter-clockwise
Zone of Catchability
ZoC
This concept covers which throws are catchable by a passer. It includes the incoming club's distance (in all directions) from the passer's shoulder (or desired catching location), the orientation of club (all dimensions), its speed of rotation, the angle (flight path) and timing of its arrival, and the speed of rotation of the club. The zone will expand or contract depending upon the pattern being juggled, and what amount of attention the juggler is using on incoming passes. Great passers have a very large ZoC and seem to effortlessly return a perfect pass. When uplifting jugglers, it is a good idea to work on expanding your ZoC while still being able to deliver perfect passes to your partner(s).